OCTAVIA'S BROOD

Science Fiction from Social Movements An anthology of visionary science fiction and
speculative fiction written by organizers and activists.

[Coming April 2015 - pre-order discounted copy here!!]

 

<< <  Page 5 of 5

Walidah Imarisha in Bitch Magazine

Demanding the Impossible: Walidah Imarisha Talks About Science Fiction and Social Change

"For me, that's one of my basic beliefs as a feminist—it's about moving those folks who have been marginalized to the center, not so we can assimilate into an existing oppressive power structure, but so that we can look at liberation through new eyes. Leah Lakshni Piepzna-Samarasinha's story, "Children Who Fly," is an amazing example of total liberation when it's viewed from the intersecting identities of those folks who have been marginalized. The idea being, these are survivors of trauma, most of them survivors of childhood sexual abuse, and they engage in the process of dissociation—which we're told is a problem, right? We're told that is something you should work to cure, and you go to therapy to cure. But in the story, instead of saying that these women of color, these trans folks, are broken, instead their ability to leave their bodies means that they can join their energy together and begin to heal this broken world. I think that's an incredibly powerful reframing.  What if everything we know is wrong? How do we begin to dream new worlds into the space we've cleared out?"

Read the full interview here!

Walidah Imarisha Interviewed in Bitch Magazine

Demanding the Impossible: Walidah Imarisha Talks About Science Fiction and Social Change

"For me, that's one of my basic beliefs as a feminist—it's about moving those folks who have been marginalized to the center, not so we can assimilate into an existing oppressive power structure, but so that we can look at liberation through new eyes. Leah Lakshni Piepzna-Samarasinha's story, "Children Who Fly," is an amazing example of total liberation when it's viewed from the intersecting identities of those folks who have been marginalized. The idea being, these are survivors of trauma, most of them survivors of childhood sexual abuse, and they engage in the process of dissociation—which we're told is a problem, right? We're told that is something you should work to cure, and you go to therapy to cure. But in the story, instead of saying that these women of color, these trans folks, are broken, instead their ability to leave their bodies means that they can join their energy together and begin to heal this broken world. I think that's an incredibly powerful reframing.  What if everything we know is wrong? How do we begin to dream new worlds into the space we've cleared out?"

Read the full interview here!

Fugitive Dreams (Portland Mercury)

Fugitive Dreams 

From Portland's Walidah Imarisha, a New Vision for Science Fiction, Social Justice, and the Future

"I HAVE ALWAYS been into superheroes and comic books," says Walidah Imarisha when we meet up at Coffeehouse-Five on N Killingsworth. Perhaps best known for her writing (everything from poetry to criticism), teaching (at Portland State University), and her public scholarship on race in Oregon, Imarisha's now putting a social justice lens on science fiction. As co-editor ofOctavia's Brood: Science Fiction Stories from Social Justice Movements, out now from Oakland's AK Press, she's also written a story for the anthology, about a "grumpy" black angel.

Read more here!

IO9 Thinks We Are Essential!

We are on the floor in total nerdgirl faints because io9 has named us one of the Most Essential Sci-Fi and Fantasy Readings for April!!!! Check us out here!

The Portland Mercury interviews co-editor Walidah Imarisha

You know Walidah Imarisha: When Gizmodo ran a piece earlier this year about race in Oregon, she was the scholar quoted throughout. We've written about her revolutionary approach to science fiction and social justice right here in these very pages. And now she's co-edited an anthology of science fiction from social justice movements, Octavia's Brood, along with Adrienne Maree Brown.

Octavia's Brood: The Blurbs

People said really beautiful things about this project. We wanted to share some of those loving words with y'all.

Like Butler's fiction, this collection is cartography, a map to freedom. 

 

Our radical imaginations are under siege and this text is the rescue mission. This is the text we’ve been waiting for.

--Ruha Benjamin, professor of African American Studies at Princeton University and author of People’s Science: Bodies and Rights on the Stem Cell Frontier

Butler could not wish for better evidence of her touch changing our literary and living landscapes. 

-- Octavia E Butler Legacy Network 

 

(Re)Writing the Future: Social Justice and Science Fiction

Roughly 100 people packed into the Independent Publishing Resource Center in Portland on December 5th, excited to spend their Friday night talking about science fiction. For the event, (Re)Writing the Future: Social Justice and Science Fiction, I moderated a conversation between Grace Dillon, an Indigenous Studies professor who edited the first-ever book of Indigenous science fiction stories, and Walidah Imarisha, a Black Studies scholar who is also co-editing the upcoming collection of science fiction by activists, Octavia’s Brood.  I loved talking to Imarisha for our recent feminism and sci-fi podcast, so I was excited to talk with her in front of a live audience.

In the second half of the night, Dillon and Imarisha led the crowd in a writing exercise: everyone wrote one page of an encyclopedia that would come out in 2070. This futuristic Peoples’ Encyclopedia offered a look back on current realities like prison policies, border disputes, and Ferguson. The encyclopedia was printed on the spot and stapled together as a zine, while participants also printed their own posters bearing a quote from science fiction author Octavia Butler (above).

Facebook Wall